Sunday, July 25, 2010

Clear glazes

What's the difference between a clear glaze and a transparent glaze? If it's the opacifier in the clear, why isn't it opaque instead of clear? And what causes a (lowfire) clear to turn milky -- is there a way to correct the glaze. Help - none of this is clear to me!

4 comments:

Nu Kua said...

I was just pondering the same question tonight after reading another post were someone was testing clear and transparent glazes (don't remember which blog). In dutch we speak about transparent glazes, there is no other word for them, makes it a lot easier. :-)
So I have no idea.....
However, I have learned that a clear glaze turns milky when it is applied to thick. I have thinned down my commercial clear glaze to a 'watery-milky' substance and then it's ok.

Randall said...

A transparent glaze can be a color. A transparent green. I guess clear could be used in the same way but usually isn't. A clear glaze can be milky if it is not fired to maturity. Bubbles form in the glaze and aren't given enough time to surface before cooling.

John Shirley said...

There is NO difference between a clear and a transparent glaze. When color is added to a clear glaze it is often referred to as a transparent colored glaze. All clear glazes can become milky if applied too thickly. to make sure that the milkiness does not occur the glaze should be applied thinner than a usual glaze application. S.G. of 1.3 recommended.

Judy Shreve said...

Thanks for your comments. I thought it was mostly about application -- but I'm still confused about clear & transparent.

Companies that make glazes sell a clear as well as a transparent -- is it just marketing or do the glazes behave differently when fired. Or are there (consistent) ingredient differences?