Saturday, February 16, 2013

Guess the glaze


Side lite....


Front lite.

Glaze, cone , atmosphere?

15 comments:

tommac said...

total guess. cone 6 reduction. glaze, i see a light blue around the fringe of the glaze, giving me the thought of a rutile or a chun. but the pin holes tell me it didn't get to total melt and gases didn't escape. but it is a guess.

tommac said...

the pinholes give me the impression of an underfired glaze that the gases escaped and the glaze didn't seal or melt enough to cover. it looks like a small blue line around the red, so my guess for that is from a copper red with rutile, or possibly a chun, cone 6 reduction. but i may hit a whammie.

tommac said...

the pinholes give me the impression of an underfired glaze that the gases escaped and the glaze didn't seal or melt enough to cover. it looks like a small blue line around the red, so my guess for that is from a copper red with rutile, or possibly a chun, cone 6 reduction. but i may hit a whammie.

Stephen F. said...

looks like an ox blood red and celadon

John Britt said...

Nice guesses. One glaze on the outside and it is an electric silicon carbide copper red! On porcelain with a liner that has blue stain. But there are three coats of the one glaze outside. I like the comment about the pinholes! Spot on!

Sarah Powell said...

Are you sharing the recipe?

John Britt said...

Yes, got to work on it a bit more but I certainly will. If you get some Silicon Carbide from Washington Mills (I think they sell it through Axner or Laguna) just try various copper red recipes at cone 6 with 0.5 % - 1.5% . Get the 600 mesh or more.

John Britt said...

Yes, give me a bit and remind me.

1ac8f5da-0fe5-11e2-a50f-000bcdcb8a73 said...

I have used silicon carbide grit made for rock polishing in my glazes with good success. If you don't have a lapidary supply nearby, it can easily be ordered off ebay in small amounts. I have seen 400, 500, 600, 3F available. (The finest I have tried is the 500.)
In my experiments, I sometimes got pinholes if the silicon carbide got out of hand. Sometimes a refiring smoothed everything out. (But refires sometimes went a darker burgundy color.)
A little silicon carbide can create some interesting effects.
Paula Lee College, Baytown, TX

Joe Troncale said...

Did you ever come up with a recipe on this? It is a beautiful glaze. I wonder if I could come anywhere close to reproducing it. Blues and reds are so striking...

Anonymous said...

I was doing experiments with SiC too, but mine was too coarse, so I got mainly bubbles. Thanks for sharing. Jarmila

docweathers said...

I am still looking forward to the formula for this glaze. I have the 600 silicon carbide, now I just need to know what to do with it.

Thanks Larry

docweathers said...

I am still looking forward to the formula for this glaze. I have the 600 silicon carbide, now I just need to know what to do with it.

Thanks Larry

Paul Wheeler said...

Hi!

I've got your book on mid fire glazes and I had a go at making an artificial red following the Panama Red recipe and adding 0.8% silicon carbide.

The test pieces have come out green with a few teeny tiny purple bits. But 99% green.

I do like the result but have you got any ideas on why it wouldn't have locally reduced to red? I fired using program E2 but a slower ramp up to top temperature.

Thanks!

John Britt said...

Try thicker and faster firing. The SiC is burning and so too thin it burns out ..too long and it burns out.